Resources for Intermediate-Advanced Korean Learners

So you’ve wanted to learn Korean for awhile. You finally took the plunge and decided to start learning Korean on Duolingo. After months of hard work, you’ve finally completed the Korean tree…now what?

This transition is the most difficult part of learning a language. It is relatively easy to go from beginner to intermediate, but a lot more difficult to go from intermediate to advanced. And it can be even more difficult to find advanced material if you’re not studying a super popular language like Spanish or French. But if you’re studying Korean, you’re in luck because you’re reading this article! Here are a few resources to help you on your path to Korean fluency:

1. LingoDeer

Duolingo may be the most popular language learning app, but LingoDeer is hands-down the best app for learning Korean. LingoDeer starts with a lesson on the Hangul alphabet, but has tons of advanced lessons on causative verbs, passive verbs, and more.

2. Talk To Me In Korean

If you’re an advanced Korean learner, you may have already come across this wildly popular Korean learning website. Like LingoDeer, their lessons range from beginner to advanced, and they even sell fun little workbooks for intermediate and advanced learners! Talk To Me in Korean also runs a podcast to supplement their online and workbook lessons, which you can find here.

3. Netflix

It’s hard to talk about Korean without mentioning televison! Online streaming services like Netflix are a great option since Korean shows are so popular right now. In fact, the kdramas You From Another Star and Boys Over Flowers are two of the five most-streamed shows internationally. Romance does dominate the genre, but Netflix does offer some Korean comedies, mysteries, and legal and medical dramas.

4. Solfa

Solfa is a personal fave of mine. This Youtube channel is all about exploring the boundaries of how people relate to one another, and is very similar to the popular channel Cut. They post videos on how we judge people by their looks, and even smell (I promise, it’s worth a watch!) My favorite series? The 40 vs. 1 blind dates!

5. Naver Blogs

If you’re interested in Korean language and culture, you have to know Naver. Much like Google, Naver is primarily known as a search engine, but they also dabble in blogs, webtoons, and more. Within their blogs, you cn search for particular topics that interest you. Most of them are written in informal Korean, so you’ll be learning how actual Koreans speak.

6. Lexody

Every language learner knows that it’s near impossible to achieve fluency without speaking! Lexody is the best way to practice speaking without making the trek to Korea. You can meet up and converse with native Koreans, all while building up confidence in your speaking abilities (and potentially making a new friend!) And did I mention that it’s free?

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